Hall Of Fame Debate: Andre Johnson


From the 1990’s to the mid 2000’s, “The U” (University of Miami) has produced NFL stars that have turned out to be present and future Pro Football Hall Of Famers. This list includes Michael Irvin, Warren Sapp, Ed Reed, Ray Lewis, and Devin Hester. Another player that can potentially join that list is Andre Johnson.

The 3rd overall pick in the 2003 NFL Draft finished his career with 1,062 receptions (11th all-time), 14,185 receiving yards (10th all-time), and 70 receiving touchdowns. Johnson was a 7-time Pro Bowler, 2-time first team All-Pro, 2-time second team All-Pro, 3-time Wide Receiver of the year, led the league in receiving yards twice and holds just about every Houston Texans’ franchise records. He spent his first 12 seasons with the Houston Texans. Johnson spent 2015 with the Indianapolis Colts and the Tennesse Titans in 2016.

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Even though his most memorable moment was probably the fight with Cortland Finnegan in 2010 (he had it coming), Andre Johnson has been a true professional on and off the field. His foundation, the Andre Johnson Charitable Foundation, has provided kids with toys in the Houston community for years.

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When it’s all said and done, I believe Andre Johnson should be in the Pro Football Hall Of Fame one day. I don’t think he’s a “first-ballot” caliber player, but he definitely deserves a spot in Canton. He has always been consistent and underrated over his established career. The best quarterback that he’s ever played with was Matt Schaub (that’s not saying a lot). The Houston Texans may have not gotten over the hump during his tenure, but Johnson has always come to play every game.

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JGOOD

Hall Of Fame Debate: Michael Vick


Growing up, there were only a few NFL players that really caught my attention because of their impact on the game. Deion Sanders is my favorite cornerback to ever lace ’em up. Randy Moss is my favorite wide receiver to step foot on the gridiron. My love for the quarterback position started with Steve Young and Brett Farve. All of them have inspired me and are now in the Pro Football Hall of Fame (except Randy Moss).

Since the dawn of time, quarterbacks have been known to stay in the pocket and deliver the ball to their targets. Until the impact of Warren Moon, the quarterback position has been predominately caucasian. Over the last 25 years, we’ve seen more diversity at the quarterback position. Also in that course of time, we have witnessed the evolution of dual-threat quarterbacks. We went from a few like Randall Cunningham, Donovan McNabb, and Dante Culpepper to the likes of Cam Newton, Russell Wilson, Aaron Rodgers, Colin Kaepernick, Dak Prescott, Alex Smith, Tyrod Taylor, and more.

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The pivotal reason for the surge of dual-threat quarterbacks in the NFL today was the emergence of Michael Vick in 2001. The former Virgina Tech star was the most electrifying quarterback in the history of the NFL. The number one overall pick, who ran a 4.25 40-yard dash time at the NFL Draft Combine, was embarrassing opposing defenses with his legs with his speed, agility, acceleration, and elusive juke moves. Also, he is the greatest video game athlete of all-time (if you played Madden 2004, you know what I’m talking about).

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Michael Vick finished his career with 21,503 passing yards, 131 passing TDs, 6,109 rushing yards (most ever for a quarterback), 36 rushing touchdowns, and went to 4 Pro Bowls. The Atlanta Falcons lead the league in rushing from 2004-2006, spearheaded by Vick, Warrick Dunn, and T.J. Duckett. Michael Vick had his best success as an overall quarterback under Andy Reid with the Philadelphia Eagles, especially in 2010 (3,018 passing yards, 21 passing TDs, 6 INT, 676 rushing yards, 9 rushing TDs). Also, he had the greatest performance of his career that season in December against the New York Giants.

I’m not going to get into the dog fighting allegations again because it’s irrelevant at the moment (CLICK HERE to check it out), and he has had injuries that have derailed some of his progress as a player. However, I believe he deserves to be in the Hall Of Fame. His statistics as a quarterback are probably not Hall Of Fame worthy, but his impact and legacy, to me, are enough credentials to get him in. Do you think Michael Vick should get in?

JGOOD

Hall Of Fame Debate: Calvin “Megatron” Johnson


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Calvin Johnson has been a nightmare for any one to matchup against during his career. His speed, athleticism, wingspan, hands, and agility separated him from the rest. Being a Chicago Bears fan, I’ve experienced my fair share of “Megatron Moments”. The most memorable to me was the touchdown that was a catch but wasn’t a catch (WATCH IT HERE).

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I’ve seen him out run my favorite team’s secondary for a few scores, catch a touchdown over 3 St Louis Rams defenders, and catch a Hail Mary over 4 Cincinnati Bengals defenders. After striking out with first rounds wide receiver disasters (Roy Williams and Charles Rogers), the Detroit Lions found their first real franchise player since Barry Sanders. Megatron has put up monstrous numbers while wearing number 81.

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Johnson has been the only source of offense until the past 2 seasons. If Megatron had any weaknesses it would be the inability to stay on the field. He always had lingering lower body problems including ankle and knee injuries. Fantasy football wise, he was a nightmare for anyone to face as well. He once gave me 50 points in a ppr league.

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Personally, he should be a first ballot hall of famer. I think he’s a top 10 wide receiver. I have Jerry Rice, Randy Moss, Cris Carter, Michael Irvin, Marvin Harrison, Terrell Owens, Tim Brown and Larry Fitzgerald ahead of Johnson.

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However, we’ve have never seen a player of his skill set before. I hope you didn’t take what we have seen for granted. Even though the Autobots have finally won, we’ll always remember what Calvin Johnson has done over the past 9 years. Where do you have him ranked all time?

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JGOOD

Hall Of Fame Debate: Marshawn Lynch


The past 2 off seasons, in addition to this one coming up, Beast Mode will be contemplating retirement. Coming over from the Buffalo Bills in 2010, Skittles has helped rejuvenate the city of Seattle after the days of Shaun Alexander (who!?). Besides that MVP season where he broke the rushing touchdown record within a single season, Alexander wasn’t productive with injuries being the main reason. Lynch also achieved what Shaun Alexander, Matt Hasselbeck, and that Superbowl bound Seahawks team couldn’t do, and that’s win it all in 2014.

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His first four full seasons in Seattle, Marshawn Lynch was flat out dominant, including the berth of Beast Mode in the first round of the 2011 playoffs against the New Orleans Saints (WATCH IT HERE). Even though Lynch hasn’t eclipsed 10,000 rushing yards for his career, it’s moments like that have left even a fairweather fan in awe.
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Probably the most memorable is his moments with the media (WATCH IT HERE). He has been the workhorse for city and the engine to their car. The Legion Of Boom has solidified their defense while Skittles has stamped his legacy into the Seattle Seahawks history books. Will his contributions be enough to get into the pro football hall of fame? What do you all think? Leave your comments below!
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JGOOD

“The Answer” The Media Didn’t Want


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First things first: Check out Allen Iverson: The Answer Documentary (Full)

After Michael Jordan retired, Allen Iverson was the next NBA superstar to revolutionized the NBA (Sorry Kobe but Allen qualifies a little more for this category and here’s a video to go along with my claim Allen Iverson vs Michael Jordan: Who Impacted NBA Players More?). Iverson finished what the “Fab Five” started back in the early 90’s with college basketball: solidify the hip hop culture in the league. Everywhere you looked, Iverson’s influence was magnified. Kids in the neighborhood parks wore cornrows, oversized t-shirts, baggy shorts or jeans, and had Allen Iverson branded Reebok’s on their feet playing ball. Everyone tried to imitate his signature crossover that’s known worldwide. Before the NBA changed their dress code, Iverson would show up to games with baggy jeans, a throwback NBA jersey, a durag, and a headband. He would dress just like anybody you would see in the inner city. I didn’t get new shoes too often growing up, but I did own a pair of Iverson’s.

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A.I. never backed down to anybody or anything no matter how big or tough the opponent or obstacle. He has played through every injury you could possibly play through and has probably hit the floor more than anybody else to ever play the game (including floppers now and days). People, including LeBron James, have called him “pound for pound” the greatest player of all-time. What separated Iverson from the rest and made him so special was his heart and his determination. He grew up in an unhealthy environment, something I can relate to. An area that’s filled negative energy, hatred, limited resources, and crime, Iverson barely made it out. Even though the was the star quarterback (also played running back, defensive back, and kick returner) for his high school as well as a basketball prodigy, trouble did follow. Him and some of his friends were arrested for fight that broke out in a bowling alley. Iverson,  allegedly, threw a chair in hit a young lady in the back of her head. He claimed he had already left the altercation when it first happened. Even though he was 17, he was tired as an adult and spent 4 months in prison. He was facing double-digit years, but the case was dismissed.  Iverson was allowed to finish his senior year at an alternative high school (no sports). Fortunately, Georgetown University’s coach John Thompson offered him a full scholarship to play basketball. Iverson won Big East Rookie of the Year and took the Hoyas to the elite 8 in his sophomore season. He’s has the all time leading scoring average for Georgetown at 22.9 points per game.

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Allen Iverson was selected by the Philadelphia 76’ers as the number one overall pick in the 1996 NBA Draft Class. Iverson exploded in the scene,  winning rookie of the year in arguably the deepest draft class of all time (Bryant, Nash, Allen, Marbury, Camby). He averaged 23.5 ppg, 7.5 apg, and 2.1 spg. The 76’ers only won 22 games that season, but they continued to grow along with Iverson. Iverson made his first playoff appearance as the 6th seed in the 1998-99 shortened season again Orlando. They were put out in the second round by Indiana. His most prominent season came in 2000-01 where his team was the best in the conference, he won the league MVP, scoring title (31.1 ppg), steals title (2.5 spg), and went to the NBA Finals.

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Allen Iverson had one the most prolific NBA Finals performances in game 1 of the 2001 NBA Finals. He dropped 48 points in an overtime victory over the Los Angeles Lakers. It was the only loss the Lakers suffered that post season. He also displayed the infamous step-over on Tyronn Lue. If you need a refresher or just want to enjoy the highlights of game on, here it is below:

Allen Iverson 48 pts 2001 GM1 NBA Finals

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Allen Iverson’s performances matched his heart and courage. He defied the odds and made everybody a believer. Iverson also stayed true to himself, even in front of the media. He always spoke what was on his mind and never backed down to anybody discouraging him. Do you remember how Iverson was portrayed for his practice rant? The NBA never liked the way he represented the league. He wasn’t as charismatic as Magic Johnson, wasn’t as clean as Michael, and was on the other side of the world compared to Larry Bird. The NBA was known for keeping their brand “clean”, but Iverson was far from that image with his tattoos and demeanor… and the NBA was stuck with him for the majority of his career.

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Allen Iverson was basically “blackballed” out the league by the media and the NBA executives. Granted they made a lot of money off of Iverson’s image to the public eye. From 2000 to about 2007, other athletes, entertainers, and fans would wear baggy clothes, tall t-shirts, jerseys, and anything that attached itself to the NBA. They were waiting for the day that Iverson would slip up to bury him. After being traded to the Denver Nuggets in 2006, his label of being the “poster child” for the NBA started to deteriorate. Eventually, he would bounce around from team to team (Detroit, back to Philly, Memphis). In 2010, Allen Iverson signed with Beşiktaş, a team in the Turkish Basketball League. He only played 10 games, but he was beloved in Turkey. No teams in the NBA wanted to sign Iverson because he was “cancerous”, “not a team player”, “wouldn’t come off the bench”, or “wasn’t coachable”. Those were the images that the media created of Iverson. We all know that Iverson had some issues off the court, and he did say at one point that he said he shouldn’t come off the bench. Eventually, he retracted that statement and matured. Iverson was willing to do whatever it takes to win a championship, and no NBA was going to give him an opportunity. How you could you say that a 11-time all-star, who won a league MVP, 4 scoring titles, 3-time steals leader, and played courageous his whole career can’t be an asset to a team making a run for an NBA title?

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A few days ago, the NBA announced that Allen Iverson would be eligible for the Hall Of Fame in 2016. In many people’s eyes, he is a no question first ballot hall of famer. His numbers and legacy speak for itself. The only thing that worries me is the members of the media will feel the same way… the ones that has the power to vote him in. The same people that pushed him out the league are the same ones who has the power to neglect him from something he should achieve with no problem. This could be the final obstacle to torment Iverson if they choose to do so. A.I. deserves this honor as a first ballot hall of famer with Larry Brown introducing him. I’m proud to have grown up in an era that showcased a player that never backed down from a challenge… and stayed true to himself. The media may remember him as someone who is all about Iverson. I’ll always remember him for someone who knocked down every obstacle that was in his way… to every problem… there was “The Answer”.

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